Emily Pinckney of the WA Environmental Justice Task Force

We are pleased to announce that Emily Pinckney of the WA Environmental Justice Task Force will be our guest speaker.

As a member of WA Environmental Justice Task Force, Emily will speak to the process and the importance the task force is to environmental justice policy and the Washington environmental landscape, as well as in addressing the needs for black and brown voices in environmental, nature, and wildlife spaces and how we are addressing barriers of entry to government, public involvement and participation.

Emily Pinckney currently serves as the Youth Volunteer Coordinator for Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium. She grew up along the Salish Sea in Tacoma. She knew since she was three years old that she loved the ocean and at 10 years old, decided to be a Marine biologist. She attended Humboldt State University and Duke University and graduated with a degree in Marine Biology and Conservation, and a minor degree in Dance Science and Wildlife Management. In her academic career, she has done research at the University of Texas Marine Science Institute, Fordham University: Louis Calder Ecological Institute, and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute: Bocas Del Toro. Her areas of study included phycology, local extinction events, biodiversity loss from climate change, human impacts on marine environments, systems of subjugation on climate change, and sensory physiology of marine animals.

Although she was involved in volunteerism early in her youth, her experiences as an underrepresented scientist led her to focus her efforts on teaching environmental justice principles and equity as well as educate underserved communities on how to navigate around systemic barriers to community-based environmental decision-making. Youth involvement and education has been the focus of her work. She currently serves on the WA Environmental Justice Task Force, Sustainable Tacoma Commission, 500 Women Scientists, and the South Sound Urban League Young Professionals. Emily now works as the Community Outreach Educator for the Seattle Aquarium.

When Emily is taking a break from science and policy, she choreographs with inspiration from many different styles of dance, mainly contemporary, African, and jazz dance. Her intersection in her identity within the environment and environmental movement are the focal topics of her art. She also enjoys scuba diving and hiking with her dog J.